Polyommatus icarus #2

Posted by Johan Dierckx (Wijnegem, Belgium) on 9 June 2010 in Animal & Insect and Portfolio.

The same specimen as the picture I showed yesterday, but this one in frontlight. Due to the sunset light, colours are a little shifted to the warm orange, making the colouring of the butterfly even stronger.

image: Broechem (B) - 02/06/2010

© Johan Dierckx

The photos on this site are copyrighted, which prohibits anyone to use them to sell, give away, use in email or newsgroups, use in a homepage or otherwise showing to the public without my explicit, prior, written permission. Please feel free to use the "contact"-button below to contact me with any questions.

All species are photographed in their natural habitat, without cutting or capturing them, and with maximal respect and the least possible disturbance to the environment.

(To see species in the same taxonomic rank (Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus), please use the tags provided with the image. The last tag is the Iso-code for the country where the image was taken. Image-date in DD/MM/YYYY format.)


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Marie LC from Dauphiné, France

I have a big pleasure every day to discover your beautiful macro

9 Jun 2010 6:38am

@Marie LC: Thank you very much for these kind words, Marie. I'm honoured.

Olivier from Manage, Belgium

just very good!

9 Jun 2010 7:15am

@Olivier: just Thx, Oliver :p

dang from Atlanta, United States

Gorgeous, the color shift only adds to the impact.

9 Jun 2010 8:39am

@dang: I agree on the colour impact. Late evening sun is becomming a favorite :-) Advantage: you don't have to get up early :-)))

k@ from Paris, France

What a great poetry here !

9 Jun 2010 9:10am

@k@: Thank you very much, k@.

Skyriani from Nelson, New Zealand

superb!

9 Jun 2010 10:14am

@Skyriani: Thank you very much, Skryani

Loner from Wörgl, Austria

Fein, daß ich dir in meiner Muttersprache schreiben kann !
Das heutige Foto gefällt mir doch ein bißchen besser, weil die Struktur der Flügel bei diesem Licht besser zur Geltung kommen.

9 Jun 2010 7:56pm

@Loner: In French they say: "Les goutes et les couleurs, on ne discutte pas". I just can't choose between the two images, and I think I don't have to choose at all. I think these images of the same specimen, made with about 1 min difference illustrates the complete other effect on a subject with back- or frontlight. It's all a matter of making choices when making an image. Thx for stopping by again and commenting and I hope you don't mind I respond in English...

Ralph from Overijssel, Netherlands

Moet zeggen dat ik de vorige mooier vind!

10 Jun 2010 10:45am

@Ralph: Dat mag, Ralph. Het is een kwestie van persoonlijke smaak ook. Voor mij zijn het twee totaal verschillende beelden en ik wil daartussen niet echt een keuze maken. Ik bekijk het ook wat "pedagogisch"... met deze twee beelden kan ik perfect de verschillen tussen tegenlicht en meelicht illustreren - voor mensen die zich niet met fotografie bezig houden denk ik dat deze beelden dat heel mooi kunnen tonen.

♏arleen from Doesburg, Netherlands

Sublieme foto's van het Icarusblauwtje:-) Knap werk, Johan!

10 Jun 2010 12:52pm

@♏arleen: Dank je, Marleen. Het is een vaak voorkomend vlindertje, en wordt even vaak "plat" gefotografeerd. Ik heb geprobeerd er eens iets anders mee te doen ... vooral de eerste is op dat vlak toch wel afwijkend van de meeste icarusblauwtjesfoto's die je tegenkomt.

Dutch from Chicagoland, United States

The perfect partner to the perfect shot yesterday, suitable for framing. It looks as though you crept around the other side of this guy to get his sunlit profile. It must have been cool out since you didn't scare him off. Bravo for this!

10 Jun 2010 3:14pm

@Dutch: I indeed crept around the butterfly to the other side - very carefull not to scare him away ... I was not carrying my tripod, so that saved me some time. The most difficult part for this image was not to create any shadow myself because sun was verry low and these butterflies do place their wings carfully cross to sun-direction in order to get as much light and warmth as possible. My sollution: holding the camera upside-down saved me 10 cm in head-hight, just enough for letting the sun pass above my head ...
It was not realy cool that evening (about 20° C) but light was dropping down, so these butterflies prepared for sleeping, searching a suitable place. My "model" already found one :-)

Canon EOS 400D
1/80 second
F/5.6
ISO 200
210 mm

animalia
arthropoda
insecta
lepidoptera
lycaenidae
polyommatus
be